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Lodgepole Pine beetle

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Lodgepole Pine beetle

Unread postby mountainman on Wed May 21, 2008 7:36 am

As some of you know Colorado has been hit with a Pine Beetle which attacks the Lodgepole Pine for the most part although the Ponderosa Pine has also been suffered from a beetle attack. Here is an article regarding the method to be used in fighting the epidemic around state campgrounds. http://www.9news.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=92175
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Re: Lodgepole Pine beetle

Unread postby skipnchar on Wed May 21, 2008 7:18 pm

I've sure been HOPING for some better news on that front. I still morn the loss of the American Chestnut trees from the Eastern forest and it sure would be a shame to see the lodgepole go the same way.
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Re: Lodgepole Pine beetle

Unread postby Limey on Thu May 22, 2008 1:31 am

I agree, Skip. We went through the devastation of Dutch Elm disease in the UK afew yaers back, and now we have this awful thing hitting the magnificent forests in the Rockies. It is just terrible to see. I sure hope that they can find something to stop this tragedy.
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Re: Lodgepole Pine beetle

Unread postby catmom on Thu May 22, 2008 6:43 pm

Yellowstone wouldn't be Yellowstone without the lodgepoles!! Where did these beetles come from? I assume they were introduced (though probably unintentionally). We have a similar - though not nearly as bad - problem with the emerald ash borer in the midwest & east; bringing firewood into state parks is pretty widely forbidden these days, in these parts.
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Re: Lodgepole Pine beetle

Unread postby skipnchar on Thu May 22, 2008 10:08 pm

Here's a link to a good article and below is some of the content.
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05528.html

Quick Facts...

* Mountain pine beetles (MPB) are the most important insect pest of Colorado's pine forests. MPB often kill large numbers of trees annually during outbreaks.
* Trees that are not growing vigorously due to old age, crowding, poor growing conditions, drought, fire or mechanical damage, root disease and other causes are most likely to be attacked.
* For a long-term remedy, thin susceptible stands. Leave well-spaced, healthy trees.
* For short-term controls, spray, cover, burn or peel attacked trees to kill the beetles. Preventive sprays can protect green, unattacked trees.

Mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae, is native to the forests of western North America. Periodic outbreaks of the insect, previously called the Black Hills beetle or Rocky Mountain pine beetle, can result in losses of millions of trees. Outbreaks develop irrespective of property lines, being equally evident in wilderness areas, mountain subdivisions and back yards. Even windbreak or landscape pines many miles from the mountains can succumb to beetles imported in infested firewood.

Mountain pine beetles develop in pines, particularly ponderosa, lodgepole, Scotch and limber pine. Bristlecone and pinyon pine are less commonly attacked. During early stages of an outbreak, attacks are limited largely to trees under stress from injury, poor site conditions, fire damage, overcrowding, root disease or old age. However, as beetle populations increase, MPB attacks may involve most large trees in the outbreak area.

A related insect, the Douglas-fir beetle (D. pseudotsugae), occasionally damages Douglas-fir. Most often, outbreaks are associated with previous injury by fire or western spruce budworm. (See fact sheet 5.543, Western Spruce Budworms). Spruce beetle (D. rufipennis) is a pest of Engelmann and Colorado blue spruce in Colorado. Injured pines also can be attacked by the red turpentine beetle (D. valens).

Mountain pine beetles and related bark beetles in the genus Dendroctonus can be distinguished from other large bark beetles in pines by the shape of the hind wing cover (Figure 1, top). In side view, it is gradually curved. The wing cover of Ips or engraver beetles, another common group of bark beetles attacking conifers, is sharply spined (Figure 1, bottom).
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